Forum - The Breach That Killed Google+ Wasn't a Breach At All
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Post 150709       October 10 '18 at 03:31 PM
By BeauHD from Slashdot's technically-speaking department:
An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Verge: For months, Google has been trying to stay out of the way of the growing tech backlash, but yesterday, the dam finally broke with news of a bug in the rarely used Google+ network that exposed private information for as many as 500,000 users. Google found and fixed the bug back in March, around the same time the Cambridge Analytica story was heating up in earnest. [...] The vulnerability itself seems to have been relatively small in scope. The heart of the problem was a specific developer API that could be used to see non-public information. But crucially, there's no evidence that it actually was used to see private data, and given the thin user base, it's not clear how much non-public data there really was to see. The API was theoretically accessible to anyone who asked, but only 432 people actually applied for access (again, it's Google+), so it's plausible that none of them ever thought of using it this way.

The bigger problem for Google isn't the crime, but the cover-up. The vulnerability was fixed in March, but Google didn't come clean until seven months later when The Wall Street Journal got hold of some of the memos discussing the bug. [...] Part of the disconnect comes from the fact that, legally, Google is in the clear. There are lots of laws about reporting breaches -- primarily the GDPR but also a string of state-level bills -- but by that standard, what happened to Google+ wasn't technically a breach. Those laws are concerned with unauthorized access to user information, codifying the basic idea that if someone steals your credit card or phone number, you have a right to know about it. But Google just found that data was available to developers, not that any data was actually taken. With no clear data stolen, Google had no legal reporting requirements. As far as the lawyers were concerned, it wasn't a breach, and quietly fixing the problem was good enough.