Shoutbox
Keii: https://www.shirtpunch.com/designs/details/the-cupcake-is-a-lie
Z-R0E: Need that for all dialogue in all things ever. Gone with the Wind: Gilbert Gottfried version
Keii: Dream do come true. Gilbert Gottfried https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3H3xQzQauyY
Keii: Avengers.EXE https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2hMcVAKPiX0&feature=share
Z-R0E: I don't remember. There was like four comedians, and two of them were from Elgin.
          Latest Forum Posts
Z-R0E: I kind of expected Godzilla to the the final frame of this.
Keii: Cameron is using terror to influence policy change. That's his own definition of terrorism. Cameron is a terrorist by Cameron's de...
Keii: Sounds like miniature black holes.
Keii: You could replace all instances of Google with Government and it would be even truer.
Keii: Disney patents something nobody will ever use ever.
          Site Updates
July 08 '13 at 10:11 PM - Personal - Current TV Shows           Updated with Summer 2013 anime
July 08 '13 at 03:47 AM - Members           NobodyxxSpecial is the newest @Z member
April 08 '13 at 02:09 AM - Personal - Current TV Shows           Updated with current season shows
          Recent Comments
Z-R0E: On the off chance you stop by here soon, happy birthday Jheinn!
jheinn: Hey Zee, just checkin' in with you. Haven't talked to you in FOREVER.
Keii: Ponies
BT Blocking Private Torrent Sites?
Posted by News Fetcher on November 26 '14 at 09:45 PM
By samzenpus from Slashdot's no-site-for-you department:
An anonymous reader writes This weekend both BT and Sky implemented the new changes, making it harder for their subscribers to reach these sites. Interestingly, however, BT appears to have gone above and beyond the court order, limiting access to various other sites as well. Over the past several days TorrentFreak has received reports from several users of private torrent sites who get an 'error blocked' message instead of their favorite sites. These include the popular IPTorrents.com and TorrentDay.com trackers, as well as scene release site Scnsrc.me. IPTorrents and Torrentday are significant targets. Although both sites require prospective users to obtain an invite from a current member (or from the site itself in exchange for cash), they have over a hundred thousand active users. The error displayed when BT subscribers try to access the above URLs is similar to that returned when users to try access sites covered by High Court injunctions.

Read Replies (0)
By samzenpus from Slashdot's in-the-future department:
Lucas123 writes An industry consortium made up by leading hard disk drive manufacturers shows they expect the areal density of platters to reach 10 terabits per square inch by 2025, which is more than 10 times what it is today. At that density, hard disk drives could conceivably hold up to 100TB of data. Key to achieving greater bit density is Heat-Assisted Magnetic Recording (HAMR) and Bit Patterned Media Recording (BPMR). While both HAMR and BPMR will increase density, the combination of both technologies in 2021 will drive it to the 10Tbpsi level, according to the Advanced Storage Technology Consortium (ASTC).

Read Replies (0)
By samzenpus from Slashdot's like-wildfire department:
Lasrick writes After four decades of confining Ebola outbreaks to small areas, experts acknowledged in an October 9 New England Journal of Medicine article that "we were wrong" about the scope of the current situation. At the present transmission rate, the number of Ebola cases in West Africa doubles every two to three weeks. Early diagnosis is the key to controlling the epidemic, but that's far easier said than done: "And there are several complicating factors. For one thing, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimate that 60 percent of all Ebola patients remain undiagnosed in their communities." A transmission rate below 1 is necessary to keep the outbreak under control (instead of the current rate of 1.5 to 2), and the authors detail what's in the works to help achieve early detection, which is crucial to reducing the current transmission rate.

Read Replies (0)
Ask Slashdot: Best Biometric Authentication System?
Posted by News Fetcher on November 26 '14 at 04:30 PM
By samzenpus from Slashdot's eyes-have-it department:
kwelch007 writes I run a network for a company that does manufacturing primarily in a clean-room. We have many systems in place that track countless aspects of every step. However, we do not have systems in place to identify the specific user performing the step. I could do this easily, but asking users to input their AD login every time they perform a task is a time-waster (we have "shared" workstations throughout.) My question is, what technologies are people actually using successfully for rapid authentication? I've thought about fingerprint scanners, but they don't work because in the CR we have to wear gloves. So, I'm thinking either face-recognition or retinal scans...but am open to other ideas if they are commercially viable.

Read Replies (0)
By samzenpus from Slashdot's our-bad department:
An anonymous reader writes A malfunction in electronic voting machines in Saline County, Kansas, left over 5,000 votes uncounted. That's roughly one-third of the votes cast. Counting those 5,207 votes didn't change any outcomes in this case however. “That’s a huge difference,” county Chairman Randy Duncan said when notified by the Journal of the error. “That’s scary. That makes me wonder about voting machines. Should we go back to paper ballots?”

Read Replies (0)
Bitcoin Is Not Anonymous After All
Posted by News Fetcher on November 26 '14 at 04:00 PM
By samzenpus from Slashdot's pulling-back-the-curtain department:
Taco Cowboy points out a new study that shows it is possible to figure out the IP address of someone who pays for transactions anonymously online using bitcoins. "The Bitcoin system is not managed by a central authority, but relies on a peer-to-peer network on the Internet. Anyone can join the network as a user or provide computing capacity to process the transactions. In the network, the user's identity is hidden behind a cryptographic pseudonym, which can be changed as often as is wanted. Transactions are signed with this pseudonym and broadcast to the public network to verify their authenticity and attribute the Bitcoins to the new owner. In their new study, researchers at the Laboratory of Algorithmics, Cryptology and Security of the University of Luxembourg have shown that Bitcoin does not protect user's IP address and that it can be linked to the user's transactions in real-time. To find this out, a hacker would need only a few computers and about €1500 per month for server and traffic costs. Moreover, the popular anonymization network "Tor" can do little to guarantee Bitcoin user's anonymity, since it can be blocked easily."

Read Replies (0)
BlackBerry Will Buy Your iPhone For $550
Posted by News Fetcher on November 26 '14 at 02:45 PM
By samzenpus from Slashdot's please-buy-our-phone department:
mpicpp points out that BlackBerry is hoping to get iPhone owners to switch to Passport smartphones by promising up to $550 to trade in their phones. "The promotion, which starts Monday, promises as much as $550 to iPhone owners who trade in their handsets in favor of BlackBerry's Passport. The actual trade-in value depends on the iPhone, with the iPhone 4S worth up to $90 and the iPhone 6 worth up to $400. (The iPhone 6 Plus is not eligible.) BlackBerry then sweetens the deal by kicking in an additional $150 as a topper for each iPhone. The deal will run through February 13, but it's good only in North America. Customers must buy the $599 to $699 unlocked Passport phone through either BlackBerry's website or Amazon. The trade-in amount comes in the form of a Visa prepaid card."

Read Replies (0)
Jackie Chan Discs Help Boost Solar Panel Efficiency
Posted by News Fetcher on November 26 '14 at 01:30 PM
By samzenpus from Slashdot's super-solar-cop department:
wbr1 writes Apparently the pit pattern on a blu-ray disk is great at helping trap photons, rather than reflecting them. Applying this pattern to the glass in a solar panel can boost efficiency by 22%. Researchers at Northwestern tested this system with Jackie Chan discs. From the article: "To increase the efficiency of a solar panel by 22%, the researchers at Northwestern bought a copy of Police Story 3: Supercop on Blu-ray; removed the top plastic layer, exposing the recording medium beneath; cast a mold of the quasi-random pattern; and then used the mold to create a photovoltaic cell with the same pattern....The end result is a solar panel that has a quantum efficiency of around 40% — up about 22% from the non-patterned solar panel."

Read Replies (0)
Fly With the Brooklyn Aerodrome (Video)
Posted by News Fetcher on November 26 '14 at 01:00 PM
By Roblimo from Slashdot's it's-not-a-drone-it's-just-a-model-plane department:
A bit of housing insulation material, a battery, a motor and propellor, a radio receiver and transmitter, and servos to control the motor and a pair of ailerons, and you're ready to fly the Brooklyn Aerodrome way. This isn't a tiny radio-controlled paper airplane, but a big bruiser with a 1:1 power to weight ratio (which means it can climb like a bat out of hell) and enough guts to fly in reasonably windy conditions while carrying a camera -- except we'd better not mention cameras, since Brooklyn Aerodrome creations, whether kits or plans, are obviously intended tohelp you build model airplanes, not drones. Timothy ran into project proponent Breck Baldwin at a maker faire near Atlanta, surrounded by a squadron of junior pilots who may someday become astronauts on the Moon - Mars run -- or at least delivery drone controllers for Amazon. (Alternate Video Link)

Read Replies (0)
DragonFly BSD 4.0 Released
Posted by News Fetcher on November 26 '14 at 12:30 PM
By samzenpus from Slashdot's check-it-out department:
An anonymous reader writes From the release page: Version 4 of DragonFly brings Haswell graphics support, 3D acceleration, and improved performance in extremely high-traffic networks. DragonFly now supports up to 256 CPUs, Haswell graphics (i915), concurrent pf operation, and a variety of other devices.

Read Replies (0)
By samzenpus from Slashdot's pay-up department:
itwbennett writes China's state-controlled Xinhua News Agency said on Sunday that an unnamed international company was forced to pay 840 million yuan ($136 million) in back taxes, as part of a Chinese government crackdown on tax evasion. The Xinhua article simply referred to it as the "M company," describing it as a top 500 global firm headquartered in the U.S. that in 1995 set up a wholly owned foreign subsidiary in Beijing. The details match Microsoft's own background, and no other company obviously fits the bill. Xinhua added, that despite the company's strengths, its subsidiary in China had not been not making a profit, and posted a loss of over $2 billion during a six-year period.

Read Replies (0)
By samzenpus from Slashdot's read-all-about-it department:
Bennett Haselton writes A judge rules that a county has to turn over the IP addresses that were used to
access a county mayor's Dropbox account, stating that there is no valid
security-related reason why the IP addresses should be exempt from a public
records request. I think the judge's conclusion about IP addresses was right,
but the reasoning was flawed; here is a technically more correct
argument that would have led to the same answer.
Keep Reading to see what Bennett has to say about the case.

Read Replies (0)
By Soulskill from Slashdot's making-bernoulli-work-for-us department:
Zothecula writes: Scotland's Albatern is putting a new, modular spin on renewable energy generation. WaveNET is a scalable array of floating "Squid" generator units that harvest wave energy as their buoyant arms rise and fall with the motion of the waves. Each Squid can link up to as many as three others, effectively creating a large, floating grid that's flexible in every direction. The bigger this grid gets, the more efficient it becomes at harvesting energy, and the more different wave movements it can extract energy from. Albatern's 10-year target is to have 1.25 kilometer-long floating energy farms pumping out as much as 100 megawatts by 2024.

Read Replies (0)
By Soulskill from Slashdot's feel-free-to-stay-on-top-of-that department:
An anonymous reader writes: A team of hackers is collaborating with military and industry groups to develop cyber security defenses for commercially available cars, in response to a growing threat from criminals and terrorists. In the U.K., hackers are now responsible for a third of car thefts in London and there are fears that while technology is progressing, older models will remain vulnerable to attack. Although there have been no reported instances of a car being completely commandeered outside of controlled conditions, during tests hackers come out on top every time – unlocking car boots, setting off windscreen wipers, locking brakes, and cutting the engine.

Read Replies (0)
By Soulskill from Slashdot's my-days-of-not-taking-you-seriously-are-certainly-coming-to-a-middle department:
An anonymous reader writes: It's no secret that prosecutors usually throw every charge they can at an alleged criminal, but the case of Aaron Swartz brought to light how poorly-written computer abuse laws lend themselves to this practice. Now, another perfect example has resolved itself: a hacker with ties to Anonymous was recently threatened with 44 felony counts of computer fraud and cyberstalking, each with its own 10-year maximum sentence. If the charges stuck, the man was facing multiple lifetimes worth of imprisonment.

But, of course, they didn't. Prosecutors struck a deal to get him to plead guilty to a single misdemeanor charge, which carried only a $10,000 fine. The man's attorney, Tor Eklund, said, "The more I looked at this, the more it seemed like an archetypal example of the Department of Justice's prosecutorial abuse when it comes to computer crime. It shows how aggressive they are, and how they seek to destroy your reputation in the press even when the charges are complete, fricking garbage."


Read Replies (0)
Older> page of news