Shoutbox
Z-R0E: Large flux of old-but-been-broken news stories coming through.
Keii: https://www.shirtpunch.com/designs/details/the-cupcake-is-a-lie
Z-R0E: Need that for all dialogue in all things ever. Gone with the Wind: Gilbert Gottfried version
Keii: Dream do come true. Gilbert Gottfried https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3H3xQzQauyY
Keii: Avengers.EXE https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2hMcVAKPiX0&feature=share
          Latest Forum Posts
Z-R0E: That goes back to the idea of an internet passport, logging on to sites using your google/facebook/twitter/oauth account. I know I...
Keii: I want my password to be a magic spell or summoning ritual that when spoken aloud either causes an explosion or summons demons.
Keii: I'm just really sick of passwords in general.The rule is: Don't reuse the same password; Keep passwords long and complex.And yet e...
Z-R0E: Good read, and it convinced me to make some changes when @Zv6 eventually gets up and running.That grc.com page was pretty eye-open...
Keii: "Creative use of game mechanics"
          Site Updates
February 13 '15 at 08:24 PM - Members           lisacolnett is the newest @Z member
July 08 '13 at 10:11 PM - Personal - Current TV Shows           Updated with Summer 2013 anime
July 08 '13 at 03:47 AM - Members           NobodyxxSpecial is the newest @Z member
          Recent Comments
Z-R0E: Large flux of old-but-been-broken news stories coming through.
Z-R0E: On the off chance you stop by here soon, happy birthday Jheinn!
jheinn: Hey Zee, just checkin' in with you. Haven't talked to you in FOREVER.
By samzenpus from Slashdot's running-the-numbers department:
An anonymous reader writes: A new group, Transparency Toolkit, has mined LinkedIn to reveal and analyze the resumes of over 27,000 people in the U.S. intelligence community. In the process, Transparency Toolkit said it found previously unknown secret codewords and references to surveillance technologies and projects. "'Transparency Toolkit uses open data to watch the watchers and hold the powerful to account,' the group's website says. 'We build free software to collect and analyze open data from a variety of sources. Then we work with investigative journalists and human rights organizations to turn that into useful, actionable knowledge. Currently, our primary focuses are investigating surveillance and human rights abuses.'"

Read Replies (0)
C Code On GitHub Has the Most "Ugly Hacks"
Posted by News Fetcher on May 06 '15 at 08:45 PM
By samzenpus from Slashdot's eye-of-the-beholder department:
itwbennett writes: An analysis of GitHub data shows that C developers are creating the most ugly hacks — or are at least the most willing to admit to it. To answer the question of which programming language produces the most ugly hacks, ITworld's Phil Johnson first used the search feature on GitHub, looking for code files that contained the string 'ugly hack'. In that case, C comes up first by a wide margin, with over 181,000 code files containing that string. The rest of the top ten languages were PHP (79k files), JavaScript (38k), C++ (22k), Python (19k), Text (11k), Makefile (11k), HTML, (10k), Java (7k), and Perl (4k). Even when controlling for the number of repositories, C wins the ugly-hack-athon by a landslide, Johnson found.

Read Replies (0)
By samzenpus from Slashdot's check-it-out department:
alphadogg writes: Netflix has released under an open-source license an internal tool it developed to manage a deluge of security alerts and incidents. Called FIDO (Fully Integrated Defense Operation), the tool is designed to research, score and categorize threats in order to speed up handling of the most urgent ones.

Read Replies (0)
Self-Destructing Virus Kills Off PCs
Posted by News Fetcher on May 06 '15 at 06:15 PM
By samzenpus from Slashdot's worst-in-class department:
mpicpp sends word about particularly bad virus making the rounds. "A computer virus that tries to avoid detection by making the machine it infects unusable has been found. If Rombertik's evasion techniques are triggered, it deletes key files on a computer, making it constantly restart. Analysts said Rombertik was 'unique' among malware samples for resisting capture so aggressively. On Windows machines where it goes unnoticed, the malware steals login data and other confidential information. Rombertik typically infected a vulnerable machine after a booby-trapped attachment on a phishing message had been opened, security researchers Ben Baker and Alex Chiu, from Cisco, said in a blogpost. Some of the messages Rombertik travels with pose as business inquiry letters from Microsoft. The malware 'indiscriminately' stole data entered by victims on any website, the researchers said. And it got even nastier when it spotted someone was trying to understand how it worked. 'Rombertik is unique in that it actively attempts to destroy the computer if it detects certain attributes associated with malware analysis,' the researchers said."

Read Replies (0)
By samzenpus from Slashdot's it's-getting-hot-in-here department:
mrflash818 writes: For the first time since we began tracking carbon dioxide in the global atmosphere, the monthly global average concentration of carbon dioxide gas surpassed 400 parts per million in March 2015, according to NOAA's latest results. “It was only a matter of time that we would average 400 parts per million globally,” said Pieter Tans, lead scientist of NOAA’s Global Greenhouse Gas Reference Network. “We first reported 400 ppm when all of our Arctic sites reached that value in the spring of 2012. In 2013 the record at NOAA’s Mauna Loa Observatory first crossed the 400 ppm threshold. Reaching 400 parts per million as a global average is a significant milestone."

Read Replies (0)
By samzenpus from Slashdot's bottom-of-the-barrel department:
chicksdaddy writes: This is a bad month for the medical equipment maker Hospira. First, security researcher Billy Rios finds a raft of serious and remotely exploitable holes in the company's MedNet software, prompting a vulnerability alert from ICS CERT. Now, one month later, ICS CERT is again warning of a "10 out of 10" critical vulnerability, this time in Hospira's LifeCare PCA drug infusion pump. The problem? According to this report by Security Ledger the main problem was an almost total lack of security controls on the device. According to independent researcher Jeremy Williams, the PCA pump listens on Telnet port 23. Connecting to the device via Telnet, he was brought immediately to a root shell account that gave him total, administrator level access to the pump without authentication. "The only thing I needed to get in was an interest in the pump," he said. Richards found other examples of loose security on the PCA 3: a FTP server that could be accessed without authentication and an embedded web server that runs Common Gateway Interface (CGI). That could allow an attacker to tamper with the pump's operation using fairly simple scripts. Also: The PCA pump stores wireless keys used to connect to the local (medical device) wireless network in plain text on the device. That means anyone with physical access to the Pump (which has an ethernet port) could gain access to the local medical device network and other devices on it. The problems prompted Richards to call the PCA 3 pump "the least secure IP enabled device" he has ever worked with.

Read Replies (0)
By samzenpus from Slashdot's some-games-are-better-than-others department:
v3rgEz writes: Not surprisingly, the FBI has compiled reports on notorious hacker gathering DEF CON, now released thanks to a Freedom of Information Act request. The files detail the lack of amusement at the Spot-the-Fed game, as well as which conference tracks attract the most interest. "In a bit of FOIrony, the file contains a copy of the Spot the Fed contest rules, including the facetious aside to feds offering t-shirts in exchange for agency coffee mugs."

Read Replies (0)
Grooveshark Resurrected Out of US Jurisdiction
Posted by News Fetcher on May 06 '15 at 02:45 PM
By samzenpus from Slashdot's back-for-another-listen department:
New submitter khoonirobo writes: Less than a week after music streaming service Grooveshark was shutdown, it seems to have been brought back to life by an unknown person "connected to the original grooveshark" according to this BGR report. Seemingly, the plan is to get away with it by registering and hosting it outside of U.S. jurisdiction. From the article: "It’s still in the early stages of development, but the team hopes to reproduce the old Grooveshark UI in its entirety, including playlists and favorites."

Read Replies (0)
By samzenpus from Slashdot's pay-the-piper department:
jfruh writes: If you use a Mac, you probably recognize MacKeeper from the omnipresent popup ads designed to look vaguely like system warnings urging you to download the product and use it to keep your computer safe. Now the Ukranian company behind the software and the ads may have to pay millions in a class action suit that accuses them of exaggerating security problems in order to convince customers to download the software.

Read Replies (0)
By samzenpus from Slashdot's check-it-out department:
crookedvulture writes: AMD laid out its plans for processors based on its all-new Zen microarchitecture today, promising 40% higher performance-per-clock from from the x86 CPU core. Zen will use simultaneous multithreading to execute two threads per core, and it will be built using "3D" FinFETs. The first chips are due to hit high-end desktops and servers next year. In 2017, Zen will combine with integrated graphics in smaller APUs designed for desktops and notebooks. AMD also plans to produce a high-performance server APU with a "transformational memory architecture" likely similar to the on-package DRAM being developed for the company's discrete graphics processors. This chip could give AMD a credible challenger in the HPC and supercomputing markets—and it could also make its way into laptops and desktops.

Read Replies (0)
By Roblimo from Slashdot's it's-more-fun-to-make-the-game-than-to-play-the-game department:
You can call Bob Paulin 'Coach' and he'll probably respond, because he's been coaching youth football since 2005. Now he's also coaching what you might call 'youth science and technology' as the Chicagoland organizer of Devoxx4Kids.org. A motto on the group's website says, 'Game programming, robotics, engineering for kids in a fun way!' And that's what the group is all about, as Bob says in this video (and in the accompanying transcript for those who prefer reading over watching).

Read Replies (0)
By samzenpus from Slashdot's all-in-one department:
An anonymous reader writes with news that Mark Shuttleworth plans to have a Ubuntu smartphone that can be used as a PC out sometime this year. "Despite the recent announcement that Windows 10 phones will be able to be used as PCs when connected to an external monitor, Ubuntu—the first operating system to toy with the idea—hasn't conceded the smartphone-PC convergence race to Microsoft just yet. 'While I enjoy the race, I also like to win,' Ubuntu Foundation founder Mark Shuttleworth said during a Ubuntu Online Summit keynote, before announcing that Canonical will partner with a hardware manufacturer to release a Ubuntu Phone with smartphone-PC convergence features this year.

Read Replies (0)
By samzenpus from Slashdot's give-it-another-30-secs department:
New submitter Bo'Bob'O writes: The BBC reports that the scientists at the Parkes and Bleien Radio Observatories in New South Whales, Australia, have tracked down earth-based signals that had been eluding observation for 17 years. These signals, which came to be called Perytons "occurred only during office hours and predominantly on weekdays." The source, as it turned out, was located right inside the antenna's tower where impatient scientists had been opening the kitchen microwave door before its cycle had finished. As the linked paper concludes, this, and a worn magnetron caused a condition that allowed the microwaves to emit a burst of frequencies not expected by the scientists, only compounding the original mystery.

Read Replies (0)
By samzenpus from Slashdot's a-side-order-of-help department:
mpicpp writes with this story about how a Pizza Hut app may have saved a woman's life. "A Florida mother held hostage by her boyfriend used the Pizza Hut app to notify police she needed help, authorities said. Cheryl Treadway, 25, was allegedly being held at knife point in her home by Ethan Nickerson, 26, in Avon Park on Monday, the Highlands County Sheriff's Office told ABC News today. 'She was held hostage by him all day,' Public Information Officer Nell Hays said. Nickerson took away Treadway's phone, police said, but she was eventually able to persuade him to let her order a pizza using her Pizza Hut app. 'She told him, "The kids are hungry. Let's order a pizza. Let's get them some food,"' Hays said, noting that's when Treadway was able to sneak in a written message through the delivery. Along with her order of a small, classic pepperoni pizza, she wrote: 'Please help. Get 911 to me,' according to police. She also wrote: '911hostage help!'"

Read Replies (0)
Why Was Linux the Kernel That Succeeded?
Posted by News Fetcher on May 06 '15 at 10:45 AM
By samzenpus from Slashdot's belle-of-the-ball department:
jones_supa writes: One of the most puzzling questions about the history of free and open source software is this: Why did Linux succeed so spectacularly, whereas similar attempts to build a free or open source, Unix-like operating system kernel met with considerably less success? Christopher Tozzi has rounded up some theories, focusing specifically on kernels, not complete operating systems. These theories take a detailed look at the decentralized development structure, pragmatic approach to things, and the rich developer community, all of which worked in favor of Linux.

Read Replies (0)
Older> page of news