Shoutbox
Z-R0E: Need that for all dialogue in all things ever. Gone with the Wind: Gilbert Gottfried version
Keii: Dream do come true. Gilbert Gottfried https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3H3xQzQauyY
Keii: Avengers.EXE https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2hMcVAKPiX0&feature=share
Z-R0E: I don't remember. There was like four comedians, and two of them were from Elgin.
Keii: what was their name?
          Latest Forum Posts
Keii: That's about $20 more a month for internet, or roughly how much extra US ISPs are charging people for services that they've marked...
Keii: And thus losing the moral highground.
Keii: A simple rename isn't going to do them any good. Just look at Xfinity.If they want people to like Internet Explorer more they're g...
Keii: This is a civil problem, not a federal problem.If people want things to change here, they need to start with themselves, not beg f...
Keii: When I read that Comcast is doing this, it infuriates me to no end. What right does Comcast have to use MY RESOURCES to make money...
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July 08 '13 at 10:11 PM - Personal - Current TV Shows           Updated with Summer 2013 anime
July 08 '13 at 03:47 AM - Members           NobodyxxSpecial is the newest @Z member
April 08 '13 at 02:09 AM - Personal - Current TV Shows           Updated with current season shows
          Recent Comments
Z-R0E: On the off chance you stop by here soon, happy birthday Jheinn!
jheinn: Hey Zee, just checkin' in with you. Haven't talked to you in FOREVER.
Keii: Ponies
By timothy from Slashdot's ever-widening-abstraction-layers department:
DeviceGuru writes Eltechs announced a virtual machine that runs 32-bit x86 Linux applications on ARMv7 hardware. The ExaGear VM implements a virtual x86 Linux container on ARMv7 computers and is claimed to be 4.5 times faster than QEMU, according to Eltechs. The VM is based on binary translation technology and requires ARMv7, which means it should run on mini-PCs and SBCs based on Cortex-A8, A7, A9, and A15 processors — but sadly, it won't run on the ARM11 (ARMv6) SoC found on the Raspberry Pi. It also does not support applications that require kernel modules. It currently requires Ubuntu (v12.04 or higher), but will soon support another, unnamed Linux distro, according to Eltechs, which is now accepting half price pre-orders without payment obligation.

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Annotated Anime: Sword Art Online II episode 7
Posted by News Fetcher on August 22 '14 at 08:00 PM
By Salvador GRodiles from Japanator:
Yikes. I never expected to be concerned about Sword Art Online II’s well-being. While there was a bit of hope for A-1 to get back on track, things are taking a slight turn for the worse with the way how they followed up on the show’s latest conflict. From the looks of it, the SAO II might be in a grim state until things pick up again.



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By timothy from Slashdot's small-team department:
rbrandis (735555) writes In a video announcement Thursday on Discovery Channel, MythBusters hosts Adam Savage and Jamie Hyneman revealed that longtime co-hosts and fan favorites Kari Byron, Grant Imahara, and Tory Belleci are no longer on the show. "This next season we're going back to our origins with just Adam and me," Hyneman said in the video, which explained that the change took hold as of the season's last episode on August 21. (Our interview with the original-and-remaining Mythbusters is one of my favorites.)

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By timothy from Slashdot's do-you-want-to-be-a-virtual-pedestrian? department:
An anonymous reader writes Google has been testing its autonomous vehicles on U.S. roads for a while now. In fact, they're required to, by law. "California's regulations stipulate autonomous vehicles must be tested under "controlled conditions" that mimic real-world driving as closely as possible. Usually, that has meant a private test track or temporarily closed public road." It's easy enough to test a few prototypes, but whenever autonomous cars start being produced by manufacturers, it'll become a lot more complicated. Now, Google is lobbying to change that law to allow testing via computer simulation. Safety director Ron Medford said, "Computer simulations are actually more valuable, as they allow manufacturers to test their software under far more conditions and stresses than could possibly be achieved on a test track." Google spokeswoman Katelin Jabbari said, "In a few hours, we can test thousands upon thousands of scenarios which in terms of driving all over again might take decades." Shee adds that simulator data can also easily provide information on how human behavior creeps into driving. "It's not just about the physics of avoiding a crash. It's also about the emotional expectation of passengers and other drivers." For example, when one of Google's computer-controlled cars is cut off, the software brakes harder than it needs to, because this makes the passengers feel safer. Critics say relying heavily on simulation data is flawed because it doesn't take into account how other cars react to the computer's driving.

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By timothy from Slashdot's teach-the-controversy department:
onproton writes Northern Illinois University recently began restricting student access to web pages that contain "illegal or unethical" content which, according to University policy, includes resources used for "political activities...and the organization or participation in meetings, rallies and demonstrations." A student raised concerns after attempting to access the Wikipedia page for Westboro Baptist Church, and receiving a filter message informing him that his access of this page would likely violate the University's Acceptable Use Policy, along with a warning that "all violations would be reviewed." This has lead to questions about whether some policies that restrict student access to information are in the best interest of the primary goal of education.

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By Soulskill from Slashdot's they're-a-myth department:
An anonymous reader writes: I have an old phone with a battery that barely works anymore. My current phone's battery is mediocre — I can put up with it, but I've been thinking about getting a new one. My four-year-old ThinkPad holds less of a charge than I'd like, and less than it did when I bought it. In all these cases, the only thing holding me back from buying a new battery is that I'm not sure where to find a good one. Searching for my phone's battery on Amazon (or any major online retailer) yields a dozen results, all fairly cheap. But which are reliable? They all seem to have varying reviews, ranging from "Perfect official factory replacement!" to "Garbage knock-off, worse than the battery I replaced." Part numbers don't seem to help, as the knock-offs replicate those pretty well. I ask you, Slashdot: where can I find a good replacement battery?

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Finding an ISIS Training Camp Using Google Earth
Posted by News Fetcher on August 22 '14 at 01:45 PM
By Soulskill from Slashdot's bet-you-wished-you'd-stuck-to-word-of-mouth department:
An anonymous reader writes: Terrorist organization ISIS has been in the news a lot lately for their hostile activities in Iraq and Syria. They've also been very active online, posting propaganda and photos on various social networking sites to try to recruit more members. Frequently, they'll have pictures of themselves in nondescript locations — but even carefully selected images give clues to a real location. Citizen journalists at Bellingcat analyzed a group of these photos, comparing buildings and bridges in the background to images from Google Earth. With very little to go on, they were able to pinpoint the location of a terrorist training camp.

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By Soulskill from Slashdot's resistance-is-futile department:
the_newsbeagle writes: To make a brain-machine interface, you need a way to capture neurons' electric signals. The most precise and most invasive way uses implants that are stuck in the gray matter. The least precise and least invasive way uses EEG sensors stuck to the scalp. But researchers at Johns Hopkins University say there's a third way that gets the best of both worlds, which is not too invasive and fairly precise. They use ECoG systems, in which a mesh of electrodes is placed under the skull, draped over the surface of the cortex.

They're testing their systems on epilepsy patients, who have these ECoG systems inserted anyway while they're waiting for surgery (the electrodes record the source of their seizures). The researchers are capturing these patients' movement commands from their brains, and using them to control robotic limbs. Someday such a system could be used by amputees to control their prosthetic limbs.


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Researchers Hack Gmail With 92 Percent Success Rate
Posted by News Fetcher on August 22 '14 at 01:00 PM
By Soulskill from Slashdot's good-enough-for-an-A department:
SternisheFan sends this report from CNET:
Researchers at the University of California Riverside Bourns College of Engineering and the University of Michigan have identified a weakness they believe to exist across Android, Windows, and iOS operating systems that could allow malicious apps to obtain personal information. Although it was tested only on an Android phone, the team believes that the method could be used across all three operating systems because all three share a similar feature: all apps can access a mobile device's shared memory. "The assumption has always been that these apps can't interfere with each other easily," said Zhiyun Qian, an associate professor at UC Riverside. "We show that assumption is not correct and one app can in fact significantly impact another and result in harmful consequences for the user." To demonstrate the method of attack, first a user must download an app that appears benign, such as a wallpaper, but actually contains malicious code. Once installed, the researchers can use it to access the shared memory statistics of any process (PDF), which doesn't require any special privileges.

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Idol of the Week: Sayumi Michishige
Posted by News Fetcher on August 22 '14 at 01:00 PM
By Hiroko Yamamura from Japanator:
Name: Sayumi Michishige
Birthdate: March 4, 1987
Hometown: Miyazaki, Japan
Measurements: 87/58/86 cm

This week get our visit from our favorite member of Japan's hit sensation Morning Musume, Sayumi Michishige. She's had quite a run since joining the band in 2003, as she's announced that her graduation from the group will take place this fall. We wish her well in her music career, and hope that she continues releasing awesome photo books, and popping up in magazines from time-to-time.



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By Soulskill from Slashdot's resistance-is-futile department:
the_newsbeagle writes: To make a brain-machine interface, you need a way to capture neurons' electric signals. The most precise and most invasive way uses implants that are stuck in the gray matter. The least precise and least invasive way uses EEG sensors stuck to the scalp. But researchers at Johns Hopkins University say there's a third way that gets the best of both worlds, which is not too invasive and fairly precise. They use ECoG systems, in which a mesh of electrodes is placed under the skull, draped over the surface of the cortex.

They're testing their systems on epilepsy patients, who have these ECoG systems inserted anyway while they're waiting for surgery (the electrodes record the source of their seizures). The researchers are capturing these patients' movement commands from their brains, and using them to control robotic limbs. Someday such a system could be used by amputees to control their prosthetic limbs.


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By Soulskill from Slashdot's friendly-until-they-have-your-money department:
jammag writes: A new trend has emerged where tech companies have realized that abusing users pays big. Examples include the highly publicized Comcast harassing service call, Facebook "experiments," Twitter timeline tinkering, rude Korean telecoms — tech is an area where the term "customer service" has an Orwellian slant. Isn't it time customer starting fleeing abusive tech outfits?

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Apple CarPlay Rollout Delayed By Some Carmakers
Posted by News Fetcher on August 22 '14 at 11:30 AM
By Soulskill from Slashdot's methods-to-increase-auto-accidents department:
Lucas123 writes: Some car makers are delaying the implementation of Apple's CarPlay iPhone interface for vehicle infotainment systems. The delays, which are prompting manufacturers such as Mercedes, Volvo and Honda to push their announcement from 2014 to 2015, appear to be related to a few snags in the integration process or in choosing which model cars should have the middleware. At the same time, many of the automakers rolling out CarPlay are also implementing Android Auto, which will provide a vehicle head unit user interface for Android smartphones. Analysts believe the addition of Android Auto earlier this year may also be causing delays because manufacturers want to be able to announce availability of both platforms in their new model vehicles.

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WTF Fridays: Good taste
Posted by News Fetcher on August 22 '14 at 11:00 AM
By Hiroko Yamamura from Japanator:


It's amazing, how unsophisticated some palates can be...



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By Soulskill from Slashdot's pretty-pictures department:
schwit1 writes: Using restored images taken by Voyager 2 when it flew past Neptune's moon Triton 25 years ago, scientists have produced a new map and flyby movie of the moon. "The new Triton map has a resolution of 1,970 feet (600 meters) per pixel. The colors have been enhanced to bring out contrast but are a close approximation to Triton's natural colors. Voyager's "eyes" saw in colors slightly different from human eyes, and this map was produced using orange, green and blue filter images. ... Although Triton is a moon of a planet and Pluto is a dwarf planet, Triton serves as a preview of sorts for the upcoming Pluto encounter. Although both bodies originated in the outer solar system, Triton was captured by Neptune and has undergone a radically different thermal history than Pluto. Tidal heating has likely melted the interior of Triton, producing the volcanoes, fractures and other geological features that Voyager saw on that bitterly cold, icy surface. Pluto is unlikely to be a copy of Triton, but some of the same types of features may be present." Dr. Paul Schenk provides provides further information on his blog, and the movie can be viewed here.

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